Scleroderma

 

Stem Cell treatment for Scleroderma provides
sufferers with tremendous hope. The protocol
is considered a successful alternative
treatment for Scleroderma, it is,
in fact, one of the most
exciting options available.

Effective Treatment for Scleroderma

Thanks to many years of experience, our team can help to successfully restore damaged skin and conjunctive tissue elasticity. This is achieved through a combination of Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapy, Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy and Ozone.

Scleroderma is an autoimmune condition in which collagen deposits in abnormally high concentration in the subcutaneous tissue and other areas of the body. In some cases, this restricts blood supply to the skin and prevents normal wound healing. Wounds fester and become infected, decreasing oxygen delivery even further. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy delivers oxygen to ischemic, marginal wounds and is known to accelerate wound healing by as much as 50%. Additionally, Hyperbaric Oxygen is an immunomodulator, which decreases the production of ICAM and Tumour Necrosis Factor-alpha by vascular endothelial cells and neutrophils

Stem Cell Scleroderma Treatment provides sufferers with tremendous hope. The protocol is considered a successful alternative treatment for Scleroderma. In fact, Stem Cell Therapy is one of the most exciting options available for healing this condition. For the past 10 years, Stem Cells have been used effectively in the treatment of Scleroderma and research results continue to be incredibly encouraging for those seeking an increase and improvement to their quality of life.

The Stem Cell Treatment works by promoting the regeneration of the damaged tissue achieved due to the Stem Cell’s ability to constrain inflammation. As Stem Cells are Non-Immunogenic, they can be applied without preconditioning and in the absence of Immunosuppressive Prophylaxis. Pluripotent Stem Cells can become the precursors of the immune system and blood cells, thus allowing them to develop into mature cells. This provides the opportunity to dramatically improve skin fibrosis in Scleroderma Patients.

Those seeking a successful solution to Scleroderma are required to attend our clinic for a minimum of one month of daily treatment in order to receive a successful outcome. During a one-month treatment course, patients receive 20 Pluripotent Stem Cell applications. Depending on the severity of the condition, patients may require further Stem Cell applications, 180 days following the initial Treatment for Scleroderma administration.

The Treatments We Offer
For Scleroderma

Overview OF Scleroderma

Scleroderma is a group of rare diseases that involve the hardening and tightening of the skin and connective tissues. The cause of the disease is inflammation of arteries and small veins in the body that result in collagen overproduction within the body’s connective tissue. In a normal situation a person produces collagen at standard levels, the skin is thereby kept limber and flexible, but in conditions where Scleroderma exists, there is an overproduction of Collagen which results in skin tissues becoming thick and motionless.

The disease increases in seriousness when internal organs are affected. This leads to the hardening of the lung, heart, kidney, intestinal tract, and joint tissues. The result is a severe risk of harm to the body’s digestive, respiratory and circulatory systems. In the most serious cases, blockages of blood to vital areas can result due to the inflammations experienced. This is precisely why Effective Treatment for Scleroderma is so crucial to overcoming this debilitating illness.

Scleroderma affects women more often than men and most commonly occurs between the ages of 30 and 50. While there is no cure, a variety of treatments can ease symptoms and improve quality of life. There are many different types of Scleroderma. In some people, this affects only the skin. But in many people, Scleroderma also harms structures beyond the skin, such as blood vessels, internal organs and the digestive tract (Systemic Scleroderma). Signs and symptoms vary, depending on which type you have.

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Symptoms Of Scleroderma

Scleroderma’s signs and symptoms vary, depending on which parts of your body are affected:

  • Skin. Nearly everyone who has Scleroderma experiences a hardening and tightening of patches of skin. These patches may be shaped like ovals or straight lines, or cover wide areas of the trunk and limbs. The number, location and size of the patches vary by type of Scleroderma. Skin can appear shiny because it’s so tight, and movement of the affected area may be restricted.
  • Fingers or toes. One of the earliest signs of Systemic Scleroderma is Raynaud’s disease, which causes the small blood vessels in your fingers and toes to contract in response to cold temperatures or emotional distress. When this happens, your fingers or toes may turn blue or feel painful or numb. Raynaud’s disease also occurs in people who don’t have scleroderma.
  • Digestive system. Scleroderma can cause a variety of digestive symptoms, depending on which part of the digestive tract is affected. If the esophagus is affected, you might have heartburn or difficulty swallowing. If the intestines are affected, you might have cramps, bloating, diarrhea or constipation. Some people who have scleroderma may also have problems absorbing nutrients if their intestinal muscles aren’t properly moving food through the intestines.
  • Heart, lungs or kidneys. Scleroderma can affect the function of the heart, lungs or kidneys to varying degrees. These problems, if left untreated, can become life-threatening.

There are 2 main types of Scleroderma:

  • Localised Scleroderma which just affects the skin
  • Systemic Sclerosis which may affect blood circulation and internal organs as well as the skin
Localised scleroderma

Localised Scleroderma is the mildest form of the condition. It often affects children, but can occur at any age. This type just affects the skin, causing 1 or more hard patches to develop. The internal organs aren’t affected.

Exactly how the skin is affected depends on the type of localised Scleroderma. There are 2 types, called Morphoea and linear.

Morphoea:

  • Discoloured oval patches on the skin
  • Can appear anywhere on the body
  • Usually itchy
  • Patches may be hairless and shiny
  • May improve after a few years and treatment may not be needed

Linear:

  • Thickened skin occurs in lines along the face, scalp, legs or arms
  • Occasionally affects underlying bone and muscle
  • May improve after a few years, although can cause permanent growth problems, such as shortened limbs
Systemic sclerosis

In systemic sclerosis, internal organs can be affected as well as the skin. This type mostly affects women and usually develops between 30 and 50 years of age. Children are rarely affected.

There are 2 types of systemic sclerosis:

  • Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis
  • Diffuse systemic sclerosis

Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis:

  • A milder form that only affects skin on the hands, lower arms, feet, lower legs and face, although it can eventually affect the lungs and digestive system too
  • Often starts as Raynaud’s (a circulation problem where fingers and toes turn white in the cold)
  • Other typical symptoms include thickening of the skin over the hands, feet and face, red spots on the skin, hard lumps under the skin, heartburn and problems swallowing (dysphagia)
  • Tends to get gradually worse over time, although it’s generally less severe than diffuse systemic sclerosis and can often be controlled with treatment

Diffuse systemic sclerosis:

  • Is more likely to affect internal organs
  • Skin changes can affect the whole body
  • Other symptoms can include weight loss, fatigue, and joint pain and stiffness
  • Symptoms come on suddenly and get worse quickly over the first few years, but then the condition normally settles and the skin may gradually improve

In some cases of systemic sclerosis, organs such as the heart, lungs or kidneys are affected. This can cause a range of potentially serious problems, such as shortness of breath, high blood pressure and pulmonary hypertension (high blood pressure in the lungs).

Causes of scleroderma

Normally, the body’s immune system fights off any germs that infect the body. It responds like this to anything in the body it doesn’t recognise, and settles down when the infection has been cleared.

It’s thought Scleroderma occurs because part of the immune system has become overactive and out of control. This leads to cells in the connective tissue producing too much collagen, causing scarring and thickening (fibrosis) of the tissue.

It’s not clear why this happens. Certain genes are thought to be involved, and having a close family member with the condition may increase your risk.

Diagnosis of Scleroderma

Scleroderma is a chronic autoimmune disease in which the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissues in the body. This triggers an overproduction of collagen, a component of scar tissue leading to the formation of the characteristic patches of thick and hardened skin. Excess collagen also may accumulate in different organs and cause damage.

There are different types of Scleroderma with different symptoms, which can make diagnosis difficult. They can be grouped broadly in two categories as localised Scleroderma, which usually affects the skin only, or Systemic Scleroderma, when internal organs also are affected.

There is no single test to diagnose Scleroderma, and patients may have to undergo several tests to exclude other conditions before a conclusion is reached. Tests also may be carried out as part of the diagnosis to see which organs the disease has affected.

Physical examination

physical examination will be done by a doctor to check for the common symptoms of Scleroderma, such as skin changes. This includes the typical thick or tight patches of skin, digital ulcers, or calcium deposits under the skin called calcinosis. The doctor also may ask about other common symptoms, such as Raynaud’s phenomenon, heartburn, difficulty swallowing, fatigue, breathlessness, or joint pain.

Biopsy

A biopsy involves surgically removing a small tissue sample to be examined under a microscope and tested in a laboratory. A skin biopsy may be taken from an altered patch of skin to help diagnose Scleroderma.

However, a skin biopsy alone cannot differentiate between localized or Systemic Scleroderma, so further tests will need to be carried out to determine whether internal organs are affected.

Blood tests

Blood tests are commonly used to diagnose Scleroderma, as they can identify the presence of autoantibodies. Antibodies normally are produced by the immune system to identify and foreign substances. However, in autoimmune conditions, the body produces “autoantibodies,” which target proteins present in healthy tissues.

Not every patient will have autoantibodies, and the type of autoantibody may vary. But the most common autoantibody detected in 60 to 80 percent of patients, regardless of Scleroderma type, is antinuclear antibody (ANA). The presence of ANA alone does not confirm a diagnosis, as it can be present in other immune disorders such as lupus.

About 60-80 percent of limited Systemic Scleroderma patients can test positive for anticentromere antibodies (ACA). Diffuse systemic scleroderma patients will test positive for antibodies against topoisomerase-1 (Scl-70 antibodies) in about 30 percent of cases.

Blood tests can also reveal whether kidney function has been affected, which can occur in systemic sclerosis.

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Tests for Raynaud’s phenomenon

Raynaud’s phenomenon is one of the most common symptoms of Systemic Scleroderma, therefore a diagnosis often will include tests for Raynaud’s. These tests include:

  • Thermography on the hands, which uses an infrared camera to detect the level of heat generated. This can be coupled with a water test, which assesses how the hands respond to immersion in cold water.
  • Nailfold capillaroscopy, which examines the small blood vessels under the fingernails.
Lung function tests

The lungs, or the blood vessels of the lungs, are commonly affected in systemic scleroderma patients. Tests may be done to assess how well the patient can breathe.

Imaging tests, such as a chest X-ray or computed tomography (CT) scan, may be needed, as this can reveal  abnormalities such as a build-up of scar tissue in the lungs.

Heart function tests

Systemic Scleroderma often can affect the heart, either through scarring of the heart tissue itself or conditions such as pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) putting strain on the heart. The two tests used to assess the heart rhythm and function are:

  • Electrocardiogram, to measure the electrical signals across the heart
  • Echocardiogram, which uses ultrasound to produce an image of the heart
Gastrointestinal tests

The digestive system can be affected by Systemic Scleroderma and may be diagnosed through an endoscopy. This involves inserting a small flexible tube with a camera through the mouth or nose, to check for abnormalities in the esophagus and intestines.

TREATMENTS FOR SCLERODERMA

Here at Poseidonia Healthcare, we offer a range of treatments for Scleroderma, here are a few benefits of the more popular treatments:

Stem Cell Therapy

Stem Cell Therapy Treatment provides Scleroderma sufferers with tremendous hope. The protocol is considered a successful alternative treatment for Scleroderma, it is, in fact, one of the most exciting options available. For the past 10 years, Embryonic Stem Cells have been used effectively in the treatment of Scleroderma and research results continue to be incredibly encouraging for those seeking an increase and improvement to their quality of life.

Stem Cell Therapy works by promoting the regeneration of the damaged tissue achieved due to the Stem Cell’s ability to constrain inflammation. As Stem Cells are Non-Immunogenic, they can be applied without preconditioning and in the absence of Immunosuppressive Prophylaxis. Pluripotent Stem Cells can become the precursors of the immune system and blood cells, thus allowing them to develop into mature cells. This provides the opportunity to dramatically improve skin fibrosis in Scleroderma Patients.

HBOT

Scleroderma is an autoimmune condition in which collagen deposits in abnormally high concentration in the subcutaneous tissue and other areas of the body. In some cases, this restricts blood supply to the skin and prevents normal wound healing. Wounds fester and become infected, decreasing oxygen delivery even further. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy delivers oxygen to ischemic, marginal wounds and is known to accelerate wound healing by as much as 50%. Additionally, hyperbaric oxygen is an immunomodulator, which decreases the production of ICAM and Tumour Necrosis Factor alpha by vascular endothelial cells and neutrophils

Risk Factors

Anyone can get scleroderma, but it does occur much more often in women than in men. Several combined factors appear to influence the risk of developing scleroderma:

Genetics: People who have certain gene variations appear to be more likely to develop scleroderma. This may explain why a small number of cases appear to run in families and why certain types of scleroderma are more common for certain ethnic groups. For example, Choctaw Native Americans are more likely to develop the type of scleroderma that affects internal organs.

Stem Cell therapy research 
Dr Smith

Clinical trials conducted in both USA and Europe support the effectiveness of Stem Cell Therapy for Scleroderma. The overall findings show that Stem Cell Therapy patients have reported lower levels of pain and fatigue and a much higher overall quality of life. While research is ongoing, the research so far is definitely encouraging for long term sufferers of the disease.

This is why popularity for Stem Cell Therapy for has been making waves across the globe.

Risk Factors

Immune System Problems: Scleroderma is believed to be an autoimmune disease. This means that it occurs in part because the body’s immune system begins to attack the connective tissues. In 15 to 20 percent of cases, a person who has scleroderma also has symptoms of another autoimmune disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus or Sjogren’s syndrome.

Environmental Triggers: Research suggests that, in some people, scleroderma symptoms may be triggered by exposure to certain viruses, medications or drugs. Repeated exposure — such as at work to certain harmful substances or chemicals also may increase the risk.

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