Treatment Breakthrough for Pulmonary Fibrosis in 2020 - Poseidonia Healthcare

Pulmonary Fibrosis

Patient Improvements
Have Included

Most of our Pulmonary Fibrosis Patients treated with the combination of Pluripotent Stem Cells and supportive therapies (including Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy, Ozone therapy, Bioresonance, Nasal Laser Therapy, Detoxing and IV Vitamin therapy), showed visible signs of improvement in the following areas.

Patient Improvements

Improved respiratory function
& forced volume capacity increase.

Stem Cells have an anti-inflammatory effect
which calms the patient’s immune system, this slows down or halts the scarring process.

Partial regeneration of lung tissue.
Formation of new vascular networks,
which contribute to tissue renewal.

Cessation of chronic fatigue.
General health improvement.
Improved sleep cycles
Improvement in quality of life.

TREATMENTS FOR PULMONARY FIBROSIS

By administering a variety of different treatments such as Stem Cell, Ozone & Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy we can treat all aspects of Pulmonary Fibrosis. Poseidonia Healthcare has the advantage of having many different therapies under one roof so we can cover all aspects of healing this disease and repairing the damage that has already been done.

Stem Cell Therapy for Pulmonary Fibrosis is our leading treatment for this condition.

Gradually over time, the benefits of receiving Stem Cell Therapy for Pulmonary Fibrosis patients is being realised. Pulmonary Fibrosis is a type of lung disease ranging in severity from mild to serious. The common characteristic of the disease relates to difficulty breathing. Stem Cell Therapy for Pulmonary Fibrosis treatment focuses largely on reducing inflammation in the lungs and freeing up the airways.

Sufferers of Pulmonary Fibrosis experience inflammation in the airways and lung damage. The result is a narrowed airway that makes it extremely difficult to both exhale and inhale. As you could imagine, this makes it hard for sufferers of Pulmonary Fibrosis to experience life to full effect.

Increasingly, Stem Cell Treatment for Pulmonary Fibrosis represents an exciting opportunity for sufferers of this debilitating disease. Over the past decade, Poseidonia Healthcare have offered Embryonic Stem Cell Treatment for Pulmonary Fibrosis to those suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases.

Stem Cells have unique properties such as immunomodulatory, proangiogenic and antifibrotic that effectively helps to inhibit inflammation, fibrosis and promote regeneration of damaged tissue.

It is important to note that the Pluripotent Stem Cells used in Stem Cell Treatment for Pulmonary Fibrosis are non-immunogenic and therefore can be transplanted without conditioning and without immunosuppressive prophylaxis. By introducing Pluripotent Stem Cells into the damaged tissue, the potential to alleviate suffering and provide reparation to the affected area is greatly enhanced.

While Stem Cell Treatment for Pulmonary Fibrosis does not provide a cure for the disease, the positive effects in reducing the pain and discomfort experienced by sufferers can prevent further damage while also drastically improving the patient’s quality of life.

Poseidonia Healthcare offers Pulmonary Fibrosis Stem Cell Treatment patients the opportunity to greatly enhance their quality of life. Pulmonary Fibrosis Stem Cell Treatment with Poseidonia Healthcare are performed by qualified, experienced and friendly staff who have the health & the welfare of the patient at heart.

What does current research say about Pulmonary Fibrosis?

Stem Cell Research for Pulmonary Fibrosis is incredibly encouraging for those investigating treatment options. A pilot study into the effectiveness of Stem Cell Therapy for Pulmonary Fibrosis produced results that suggest 82% of patients suffering from the disease experienced improvements to their quality of life following treatment. While further research is still being conducted into the effectiveness of treatment, it is evident that early results are extremely encouraging.

The Treatments We Offer For Pulmonary Fibrosis

Overview

Pulmonary Fibrosis is a lung disease that occurs when lung tissue becomes damaged and scarred. This thickened, stiff tissue makes it more difficult for your lungs to work properly. As Pulmonary Fibrosis worsens, you become progressively more short of breath.

The scarring associated with Pulmonary Fibrosis can be caused by a multitude of factors. But in most cases, doctors can’t pinpoint what’s causing the problem. When a cause can’t be found, the condition is termed idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

The lung damage caused by Pulmonary Fibrosis can’t be repaired, but medications and therapies can sometimes help ease symptoms and improve quality of life. For some people, a lung transplant might be appropriate.

Symptoms of
Pulmonary Fibrosis

The course of Pulmonary Fibrosis and the severity of symptoms can vary considerably from person to person. Some people become ill very quickly with severe disease. Others have moderate symptoms that worsen more slowly, over months or years.

Some people may experience a rapid decline of their symptoms (acute exacerbation), such as severe shortness of breath, that may last for several days to weeks. People who have acute exacerbations may be placed on a mechanical ventilator. Doctors may also prescribe antibiotics, corticosteroid medications or other medications to treat an acute exacerbation.

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Signs and symptoms of Pulmonary Fibrosis may include:

  • A dry cough
  • Fatigue
  • Aching muscles and joints
  • Shortness of breath (dyspnea)
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Widening and rounding of the tips of the fingers or toes (clubbing)

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Causes of Pulmonary Fibrosis

Pulmonary Fibrosis scars and thickens the tissue around and between the air sacs (alveoli) in your lungs. This makes it more difficult for oxygen to pass into your bloodstream. The damage can be caused by many different factors including long-term exposure to certain toxins, certain medical conditions, radiation therapy and some medications.

Occupational and environmental factors

Long-term exposure to a number of toxins and pollutants can damage your lungs. These include:

  • Silica dust
  • Asbestos fibres
  • Hard metal dusts
  • Coal dust
  • Grain dust
  • Bird and animal droppings
Radiation treatments

Some people who receive radiation therapy for lung or breast cancer show signs of lung damage months or sometimes years after the initial treatment. The severity of the damage may depend on:

  • How much of the lung was exposed to radiation
  • The total amount of radiation administered
  • Whether chemotherapy also was used
  • The presence of underlying lung disease
Medications

Many drugs can damage your lungs, especially medications such as:

  • Chemotherapy drugs. Drugs designed to kill cancer cells, such as methotrexate (Trexall, Otrexup, others) and cyclophosphamide, can also damage lung tissue.
  • Heart medications. Some drugs used to treat irregular heartbeats, such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Nexterone, Pacerone), may harm lung tissue.
  • Some antibiotics. Antibiotics such as nitrofurantoin (Macrobid, Macrodantin, others) or ethambutol can cause lung damage.
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs. Certain anti-inflammatory drugs such as rituximab (Rituxan) or sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) can cause lung damage.
Medical conditions

Lung damage can also result from a number of conditions, including:

  • Dermatomyositis
  • Polymyositis
  • Mixed connective tissue disease
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus

Many substances and conditions can lead to Pulmonary Fibrosis. Even so, in most cases, the cause is never found. Pulmonary Fibrosis with no known cause is called Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

Researchers have several theories about what might trigger idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis, including viruses and exposure to tobacco smoke. Also, some forms of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis run in families, and heredity may play a role in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

Many people with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis may also have Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) a condition that occurs when acid from your stomach flows back into your esophagus. Ongoing research is evaluating if GERD may be a risk factor for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis, or if GERD may lead to a more rapid progression of the condition. However, more research is needed to determine the association between Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and GERD.

Diagnosis for Pulmonary Fibrosis

To diagnose your condition, your doctor may review your medical and family history, discuss your signs and symptoms, review any exposure you’ve had to dusts, gases and chemicals, and conduct a physical exam. During the physical exam, your doctor will use a stethoscope to listen carefully to your lungs while you breathe. He or she may also suggest one or more of the following tests.

Imaging tests

Chest X-ray: A chest X-ray shows images of your chest. This may show the scar tissue typical of Pulmonary Fibrosis, and it may be useful for monitoring the course of the illness and treatment. However, sometimes the chest X-ray may be normal, and further tests may be required to explain your shortness of breath.

Computerized tomography (CT) scan: CT scanners use a computer to combine X-ray images taken from many different angles to produce cross-sectional images of internal structures in the body. A high-resolution CT scan can be particularly helpful in determining the extent of lung damage caused by Pulmonary Fibrosis. Also, some kinds of fibrosis have characteristic patterns.

Echocardiogram: An echocardiogram uses sound waves to visualize the heart. It can produce still images of your heart’s structures, as well as videos that show how your heart is functioning. This test can evaluate the amount of pressure occurring in the right side of your heart.

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Pulmonary Fibrosis - Poseidonia Healthcare

Lung function tests

Pulmonary function testing. Several types of Pulmonary function tests may be conducted. In a test called spirometry, you exhale quickly and forcefully through a tube connected to a machine. The machine measures how much air your lungs can hold and how quickly you can move air in and out of your lungs. Other tests may be conducted to measure your lung volumes and diffusing capacity.

Pulse oximetry. This simple test uses a small device placed on one of your fingers to measure the oxygen saturation in your blood. Oximetry can serve as a way to monitor the course of the disease.

Exercise stress test. An exercise test on a treadmill or stationary bike may be used to monitor your lung function when you’re active.

Arterial blood gas test. In this test, your doctor tests a sample of your blood, usually taken from an artery in your wrist. The oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in the sample are then measured.

Tissue sample (biopsy)

If other tests haven’t diagnosed the condition, doctors may need to remove a small amount of lung tissue (biopsy). The biopsy is then examined in a laboratory to diagnose Pulmonary Fibrosis or rule out other conditions. The tissue sample may be obtained in one of these ways:

  • Bronchoscopy. In this procedure, your doctor removes very small tissue samples generally no larger than the head of a pin using a small, flexible tube (bronchoscope) that’s passed through your mouth or nose into your lungs. The tissue samples are sometimes too small for an accurate diagnosis. The biopsy may also be used to rule out other conditions. The risks of bronchoscopy are generally minor and might include a temporary sore throat or discomfort in your nose from the passage of the bronchoscope. However, serious complications can include bleeding or a deflated lung. During bronchoscopy, your doctor may conduct an additional procedure called bronchoalveolar lavage. In this procedure, your doctor injects saltwater through a bronchoscope into a section of your lung, and then immediately suctions it out. The solution that’s withdrawn contains cells from your air sacs. Although bronchoalveolar lavage samples a larger area of the lung than other procedures do, it may not provide enough information to diagnose pulmonary fibrosis. It might also be used to rule out other conditions.
  • Surgical biopsy. Although a surgical biopsy is more invasive and has potential complications, it may be the only way to obtain a large enough tissue sample to make an accurate diagnosis. This procedure may be done as minimally invasive surgery, called video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), or as an open surgery (thoracotomy). During VATS, your surgeon inserts surgical instruments and a small camera through two or three small incisions between your ribs. The camera allows your surgeon to view your lungs on a video monitor while removing tissue samples from your lungs. This procedure is performed after you’ve been given a general anaesthetic, so you’ll be asleep during the procedure. During open surgery (thoracotomy), a surgeon removes a lung sample through an incision in the chest between your ribs. The procedure takes place after you’ve been given a general anaesthetic.

Treatments for Pulmonary Fibrosis

Ozone Therapy

Ozone Therapy simultaneously destroys cells that have been damaged by infection or chronic inflammation, it also stimulates the defence mechanisms of healthy cells. Ozone Therapy is effective for regulating the immune system and is of great benefit to anyone suffering from allergies, autoimmune conditions, or inflammatory conditions (the root cause of many chronic diseases). The half-live of Ozone is approximate 40-mins, therefore, the ozonized solution is prepared immediately before the treatment. The time of the procedure is 20 minutes.

Stem Cell Therapy

​Stem Cell Therapy for Pulmonary Fibrosis is our leading treatment for this condition.

Gradually over time, the benefits of receiving Stem Cell Therapy for Pulmonary Fibrosis patients is being realised. Pulmonary Fibrosis is a type of lung disease ranging in severity from mild to serious. The common characteristic of the disease relates to difficulty breathing. Stem Cell Therapy for Pulmonary Fibrosis treatment focuses largely on reducing inflammation in the lungs and freeing up the airways.

Sufferers of Pulmonary Fibrosis experience inflammation in the airways and lung damage. The result is a narrowed airway that makes it extremely difficult to both exhale and inhale. As you could imagine, this makes it hard for sufferers of Pulmonary Fibrosis to experience life to full effect.

Increasingly, Stem Cell Treatment for Pulmonary Fibrosis represents an exciting opportunity for sufferers of this debilitating disease. Over the past decade, Poseidonia Healthcare has offered Embryonic Stem Cell Treatment for Pulmonary Fibrosis to those suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases.

Stem Cells have unique properties such as immunomodulatory, proangiogenic and antifibrotic that effectively helps to inhibit inflammation, fibrosis and promote regeneration of damaged tissue.

It is important to note that the Pluripotent Stem Cells used in Stem Cell Treatment for Pulmonary Fibrosis are non-immunogenic and therefore can be transplanted without conditioning and without immunosuppressive prophylaxis. By introducing Pluripotent Stem Cells into the damaged tissue, the potential to alleviate suffering and provide reparation to the affected area is greatly enhanced.

While Stem Cell Treatment for Pulmonary Fibrosis does not provide a cure for the disease, the positive effects in reducing the pain and discomfort experienced by sufferers can prevent further damage while also drastically improving the patient’s quality of life.

Poseidonia Healthcare offers Pulmonary Fibrosis Stem Cell Treatment patients the opportunity to greatly enhance their quality of life. Pulmonary Fibrosis Stem Cell Treatment with Poseidonia Healthcare are performed by qualified, experienced and friendly staff who have the health & the welfare of the patient at heart.

Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

The symptoms of IPF tend to develop gradually and get slowly worse over time.

Symptoms can include:
Shortness of breath
A persistent dry cough
Tiredness
Loss of appetite and weight loss
Many people ignore their breathlessness at first and blame it on getting old or being out of shape.

When to get Medical Advice
Dr Smith

See a GP if you have struggled with your breathing for a while or have had a cough for more than 3 weeks.

These symptoms are not normal and should not be ignored.

If a GP thinks you could have a lung condition such as IPF, they can refer you to a hospital specialist for tests such as:

breathing (lung function) tests
blood tests
a chest X-ray and CT scan
a lung biopsy, where a small piece of lung tissue is removed during keyhole surgery so it can be analysed

Outlook For IPF

IPF gets worse over time, although the speed at which this happens is highly variable.

Some people respond well to treatment and remain relatively free of symptoms for many years, while others may get rapidly worse or find the breathlessness debilitating.

Other problems can also sometimes develop, including chest infections, pulmonary hypertension and heart failure.

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Benefits of Embryonic Stem Cells
for those with Pulmonary Fibrosis

P

luripotent Stem Cells are known to elongate the telomeres and they repair skin fibroblasts as established in our rejuvenation studies. This is why patients who suffer from Pulmonary Fibrosis are able to reverse some or all of their symptoms. The Pluripotent Stem Cell treatment that we offer in combination with specific peptides such as GHK peptide.

During the first week of the Pulmonary Fibrosis treatment, patients notice increased energy, increased capacity to walk. By the end of the 4th week of treatment, most of the Pulmonary Fibrosis patients have significantly better breathing and capacity of movement. Their family also notice changes in their mood, in their desire to plan ahead and live as their impairment lessens. Progress will depend on how severe the condition is as well as whether other organs have degenerated or not.

Each condition is reviewed at the beginning of the treatment and programs are adapted to the needs of each patient. A minimum of 4 weeks is usually recommended in order to see significant changes in the patient’s condition.

To learn more about our protocol or to be directed to an affiliated practitioner, Click the “ask a question” button below.

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