Arthritis

 

A Multi treatment approach to treat
Arthritis for best results

TREATMENTS FOR ARTHRITIS

Stem Cell Treatment

Our Pluripotent Stem cells hold potential as treatment, in part, because they can communicate to the 220 type of cells in the body to promote growth and healing to cells in the body. Using stem cells to treat Arthritis already has been reported to produce very good results, with the ultimate goal of using stem cells to regrow cartilage

HBOT

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is one of the complementary therapies highly recommended by an increasing number of physicians for rheumatoid Arthritis and other chronic pain disorders. HBOT can be prescribed as an adjunct or alternative to drug treatments and other common Arthritis therapies.

On top of aiding the repair of diseased joints, HBOT has been found to be beneficial towards lowering blood sedimentation rate, stabilizing immunologic function, strengthening the body’s resistance for eliminating pathogenic factors, suppressing inflammation and treating analgesia.

OZONE THERAPY

Ozone Therapy is a technique based on the application of a concentration of oxygen and ozone. The compound rapidly dissolves in the body and comes into contact with the molecules, generating acute oxidative stress. This has many benefits:

  • It improves tissue oxygenation by increasing oxygen transport capacity.
  • Antiplatelet effect.
  • It improves the body’s antioxidant systems.
  • Bactericidal and disinfectant effects.
  • It helps the immune system combat infections and autoimmune diseases.

In addition to these benefits for the treatment of osteoarthritis, Ozone Therapy, in many cases, is making it possible to reduce medication. Not to mention that recovery is becoming faster. And, as they start feeling better, the state of mind of patients also improves. This enables them to return to their day-to-day activities earlier, which increases their quality of life. Also, because it does not involve the use of drugs, ozone therapy has no side effects and does not interact with other drugs.

All of this explains why ozone therapy is increasingly being used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and conditions with chronic inflammation such as Arthritis. In fact, it is also being used to treat other disorders such as herniated discs, lower back pain and cervicalgia. It is a quick, effective and painless technique. And it can be applied on an outpatient basis, has very few contraindications and produces no complications if it is carried out by qualified personnel.

The Treatments We
Offer For Arthritis

Overview

Arthritis is the swelling and tenderness of one or more of your joints. The main symptoms are joint pain and stiffness, which typically worsen with age. The most common types are Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Osteoarthritis causes cartilage (the hard, slippery tissue that covers the ends of bones where they form a joint) to break down. Rheumatoid is a disease in which the immune system attacks the joints, beginning with the lining of joints.

Uric acid crystals, which form when there’s too much uric acid in your blood, can cause gout. Infections or underlying disease, such as psoriasis or lupus, can cause other types of Arthritis.

Treatments vary depending on the type you have. The main goals of any treatments are to reduce symptoms and improve quality of life.

Types of arthritis

The 2 most common types are Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

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Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of Arthritis, it most often develops in adults who are in their mid-40s or older. It’s also more common in women and people with a family history of the condition, But it can occur at any age as a result of an injury or be associated with other joint-related conditions, such as gout or Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Osteoarthritis initially affects the smooth cartilage lining of the joint. This makes movement more difficult than usual, leading to pain and stiffness. Once the cartilage lining starts to roughen and thin out, the tendons and ligaments have to work harder. This can cause swelling and the formation of bony spurs called osteophytes. Severe loss of cartilage can lead to bone rubbing on bone, altering the shape of the joint and forcing the bones out of their normal position.

The most commonly affected joints are those in the:

  • Hands
  • Spine
  • Knees
  • Hips
Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis often starts when a person is between 40 and 50 years old. Women are 3 times more likely to be affected than men. With this condition, the body’s immune system targets affected joints, which leads to pain and swelling with the outer covering (synovium) of the joint is the first place affected.

This can then spread across the joint, leading to further swelling and a change in the joint’s shape. This may cause the bone and cartilage to break down. People with this condition can also develop problems with other tissues and organs in their body.

Other types of arthritis and related conditions
  • Ankylosing spondylitis: A long-term inflammatory condition that mainly affects the bones, muscles and ligaments of the spine, leading to stiffness and joints fusing together. Other problems can include the swelling of tendons, eyes and large joints.
  • Cervical spondylosis: Also known as degenerative osteoarthritis, cervical spondylitis affects the joints and bones in the neck, which can lead to pain and stiffness.
  • Fibromyalgia: Causes pain in the body’s muscles, ligaments and tendons.
  • Lupus: An autoimmune condition that can affect many different organs and the body’s tissues.
  • Gout: A type of Arthritis caused by too much uric acid in the body. This can be left in joints (usually affecting the big toe), but can develop in any joint. It causes intense pain, redness and swelling.
  • Psoriatic arthritis: An inflammatory joint condition that can affect people with psoriasis.
  • Enteropathic arthritis: A form of chronic inflammatory arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the 2 main types being ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. About 1 in 5 people with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis will develop enteropathic Arthritis. The most common areas affected by inflammation are the peripheral (limb) joints and the spine.
  • Reactive arthritis: This can cause inflammation of the joints, eyes and the tube that urine passes through (urethra). It develops shortly after an infection of the bowel, genital tract or, less frequently, after a throat infection.
  • Secondary arthritis: A type of Arthritis that can develop after a joint injury and sometimes occurs many years afterwards.
  • Polymyalgia rheumatica: A condition that almost always affects people over 50 years of age, where the immune system causes muscle pain and stiffness, usually across the shoulders and tops of the legs. It can also cause joint inflammation.

Symptoms of arthritis

There are lots of different types of Arthritis and the symptoms you experience will vary depending on the type you have.

This is why it’s important to have an accurate diagnosis if you have:

  • Joint pain, tenderness and stiffness
  • Inflammation in and around the joints
  • Restricted movement of the joints
  • Warm red skin over the affected joint
  • Weakness and muscle wasting

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Arthritis and children

Arthritis is often associated with older people, but it can also affect children. Most types of childhood Arthritis are known as juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). JIA causes pain and inflammation in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks. Although the exact cause of JIA is unknown, the symptoms often improve as a child gets older, meaning they can lead a normal life.

The main types of JIA are:

Oligo-articular JIA

Oligo-articular JIA is the most common type of JIA. It affects up to 4 joints in the body, most commonly in the knees, ankles and wrists. Oligo-articular JIA often goes away without causing long-term joint damage.

But there’s a risk that children with the condition may develop eye problems, so regular eye tests with an eye care specialist called an ophthalmologist are recommended.

Polyarticular JIA (polyarthritis)

Polyarticular JIA, or polyarthritis, is the second most common type of JIA and affects 5 or more joints. It can affect a child of any age and may come on suddenly or develop gradually.

The symptoms of polyarticular JIA are similar to the symptoms of adult Rheumatoid arthritis. A child with the condition may also feel unwell and may occasionally have a high temperature of 38C or above.

Systemic onset JIA

Systemic onset JIA begins with symptoms such as a fever, rash, a lack of energy and enlarged glands. Later on, joints can become swollen and inflamed. Like polyarticular JIA, systemic onset JIA can affect children of any age.

Enthesitis-related arthritis

Enthesitis-related Arthritis is a type of juvenile Arthritis that often affects the joints of the leg and spine, causing inflammation where the tendons attach to the bone. It can cause stiffness in the neck and lower back in the teenage years.

It’s also linked to a painful eye condition called acute uveitis.

Causes Of Arthritis

The two main causes of this condition, Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid damage joints in different ways.

Osteoarthritis

The most common type of Arthritis, Osteoarthritis involves wear-and-tear damage to your joint’s cartilage, the hard, slick coating on the ends of bones where they form a joint. Cartilage cushions the ends of the bones and allows nearly frictionless joint motion, but enough damage can result in bone grinding directly on bone, which causes pain and restricted movement. This wear and tear can occur over many years, or it can be hastened by a joint injury or infection.

Osteoarthritis also affects the entire joint. It causes changes in the bones and deterioration of the connective tissues that attach muscle to bone and hold the joint together. It also causes inflammation of the joint lining.

Rheumatoid arthritis

In Rheumatoid Arthritis, the body’s immune system attacks the lining of the joint capsule, a tough membrane that encloses all the joint parts. This lining (synovial membrane) becomes inflamed and swollen. The disease process can eventually destroy cartilage and bone within the joint.

Diagnosis Of Arthritis

During the physical exam, your doctor will check your joints for swelling, redness and warmth. He or she will also want to see how well you can move your joints.

Depending on the type of Arthritis suspected, your doctor may suggest some of the following tests.

Laboratory tests

The analysis of different types of body fluids can help pinpoint the type you may have. Fluids commonly analysed include blood, urine and joint fluid. To obtain a sample of your joint fluid, your doctor will cleanse and numb the area before inserting a needle in your joint space to withdraw some fluid.

Imaging

These types of tests can detect problems within your joint that may be causing your symptoms. Examples include:

  • X-rays. Using low levels of radiation to visualize bone, X-rays can show cartilage loss, bone damage and bone spurs. X-rays may not reveal early arthritic damage, but they are often used to track progression of the disease.
  • Computerized tomography (CT). CT scanners take X-rays from many different angles and combine the information to create cross-sectional views of internal structures. CTs can visualize both bone and the surrounding soft tissues.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Combining radio waves with a strong magnetic field, MRI can produce more-detailed cross-sectional images of soft tissues such as cartilage, tendons and ligaments.
  • Ultrasound. This technology uses high-frequency sound waves to image soft tissues, cartilage and fluid-containing structures near the joints (bursae). Ultrasound is also used to guide needle placement for joint aspirations and injections.

Treatments For Arthritis

Here at Poseidonia Healthcare, we offer a full range of treatments for Arthritis, here are a few benefits of the more popular treatments:

HBOT

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is one of the complementary therapies highly recommended by an increasing number of physicians for Rheumatoid Arthritis and other chronic pain disorders. HBOT can be prescribed as an adjunct or alternative to drug treatments and other common therapies.

On top of aiding the repair of diseased joints, HBOT has been found to be beneficial towards lowering blood sedimentation rate, stabilizing immunologic function, strengthening the body’s resistance for eliminating pathogenic factors, suppressing inflammation and treating analgesia.

OZONE THERAPY

Ozone Therapy is a technique based on the application of a concentration of oxygen and ozone. The compound rapidly dissolves in the body and comes into contact with the molecules, generating acute oxidative stress. This has many benefits:

  • It improves tissue oxygenation by increasing oxygen transport capacity.
  • Antiplatelet effect.
  • It improves the body’s antioxidant systems.
  • Bactericidal and disinfectant effects.
  • It helps the immune system combat infections and autoimmune diseases.

In addition to these benefits for the treatment of Osteoarthritis, Ozone Therapy, in many cases, is making it possible to reduce medication. Not to mention that recovery is becoming faster. And, as they start feeling better, the state of mind of patients also improves. This enables them to return to their day-to-day activities earlier, which increases their quality of life. Also, because it does not involve the use of drugs, Ozone Therapy has no side effects and does not interact with other drugs.

All of this explains why Ozone Therapy is increasingly being used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and conditions with chronic inflammation such as Arthritis. In fact, it is also being used to treat other disorders such as herniated discs, lower back pain and cervicalgia. It is a quick, effective and painless technique. And it can be applied on an outpatient basis, has very few contraindications and produces no complications if it is carried out by qualified personnel.

Cryotherapy 

Cryotherapy was original created in japan in 1980 to specifically treat Rheumatoid Arthritis. This treatment reduces the pain and inflammation that is associated with this sometimes-crippling condition. By bringing the body temperature down it actually relives the ache that patients feel in their joints.

Have you ever applied an Ice pack to an injury? If so then you have already experienced Cryotherapy on a smaller scale. Cryotherapy using our ICE QUEEN Whole Body Cryotherapy chamber will in most cases reduce any and all inflammations throughout your body relating to Arthritis. Healing will occur in more than one area at a time and in a much higher and effective manner. Imagine you have pain in both your arm and leg; Cryotherapy will automatically target these areas during the same treatment. Cryotherapy also stimulates the vagus nerve, which in turn reduces anxiety and fatigue.

The Vagus nerve is the Body’s ‘Manager’ of your inner nerve centre – the parasympathetic nervous system, to be specific. Like a good Manager, the Vagus nerve does a fantastic job of overseeing a vast range of crucial functions; including communicating nerve impulses to every organ in your body.

Osteoarthritis Arthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of Arthritis, It most often develops in adults who are in their mid-40s or older. It’s also more common in women and people with a family history of the condition.

But it can occur at any age as a result of an injury or be associated with other joint-related conditions. Osteoarthritis initially affects the smooth cartilage lining of the joint. This makes movement more difficult than usual, leading to pain and stiffness.

Stem Cell Treatment
Dr Smith

Our Pluripotent Stem cells hold potential as treatment, in part, because they can communicate to the 220 type of cells in the body to promote growth and healing to cells in the body. Using stem cells to treat Arthritis already has been reported to produce very good results, with the ultimate goal of using stem cells to regrow cartilage

Rheumatoid Arthritis

It often starts when a person is between 40 and 50 years old. Women are 3 times more likely to be affected than men. In Rheumatoid Arthritis, the body’s immune system targets affected joints, which leads to pain and swelling.

The outer covering (synovium) of the joint is the first place affected. This can then spread across the joint, leading to further swelling and a change in the joint’s shape. This may cause the bone and cartilage to break down.

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